hook in faliure (almost)

Please tell what happened and how it might have been avoided. Names should be ommitted. This forum should help others learn from mistakes that caused or nearly caused a mishap.
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jdevorak
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hook in faliure (almost)

Post by jdevorak » Thu Sep 22, 2016 8:26 am

My normal procedure is to hook in my harness to the glider and then get into my harness. A new step was added to the procedure because my new radio PTT is hard wired and needs to be dealt with. I remember looking at my hang strap and back up. I remember screwing my carbineer closed. I walked up to launch. Andy Beem was my nose man. He asked me if I was going to do a hang check. I said No. I'm already hooked in. He said I wasn't. I repeated I am hooked in. He looked me straight in the face and said your not hooked in. He looked so sincere that I turned around to grab it and prove I was. I wasn't.

I don't like doing several checks on launch. Standing on launch is where one is most vulnerable. I think a pilot should be paying attention to conditions not turning around backwards. That is unless you have a nose man paying attention for you. Anyway, in the future I am going to adopt Greg Kendall's method. Create a dead man's line back from launch which I do not cross unless I double check.
eat right, exercise, die anyway!

beemer
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hook in failure (almost)

Post by beemer » Thu Sep 22, 2016 10:03 am

Failure to hook in is my biggest fear in hang gliding!I'm glad it was caught before a launch attempt but it put fear in me how close it was.

beemer
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hook in failure (almost)

Post by beemer » Thu Sep 22, 2016 10:03 am

Failure to hook in is my biggest fear in hang gliding!I'm glad it was caught before a launch attempt but it put fear in me how close it was.

beemer
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hook in failure (almost)

Post by beemer » Thu Sep 22, 2016 10:05 am

Failure to hook in is my biggest fear in hang gliding!I'm glad it was caught before a launch attempt but it put fear in me how close it was.
:D

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DrJeff
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Thankful!!

Post by DrJeff » Thu Sep 22, 2016 4:38 pm

So thankful to hear of this good-news-story-ending! A great reminder for all of us.

Dr. Jeff
Jeff Bjorck
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Malury
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Post by Malury » Thu Sep 22, 2016 5:02 pm

That's why I think of our club as a "Brotherhood". Andy, thanks for looking out for our brother Jay. Ya dun good!

mario
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Post by mario » Fri Sep 23, 2016 8:00 am

Thank you Andy!!
My biggest fear too! The brain can play some mean tricks sometimes.
We have lost too many good people this way.
We need more people like Andy!!!!

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Don
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"Joe Greblo Hook-In Check"

Post by Don » Fri Sep 23, 2016 2:11 pm

My routine is to do some ground handling on launch, put the glider down, and do a "Joe Greblo Hook-In Check". Sorry for the people behind me but that is how I was taught!

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JD
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Post by JD » Fri Sep 23, 2016 4:47 pm

As close as practical before I run off a launch ramp I lift the glider until I feel the tug of my leg loops. The philosophy of "You're always unhooked" or "The gun is always loaded" works a treat. I don't give rat's ass who invented or promoted this approach but it sure works for me.

filthy
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Post by filthy » Sun Sep 25, 2016 8:46 am

I no longer use the lift and feel the leg loops. Because I launched unhooked, the rear wires lifted my harness not the hang strap.

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JD
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Post by JD » Sun Sep 25, 2016 6:02 pm

filthy wrote:I no longer use the lift and feel the leg loops. Because I launched unhooked, the rear wires lifted my harness not the hang strap.
I have never heard this before. Could you please elaborate on the whole event? Thanks

greblo
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Post by greblo » Thu Sep 29, 2016 9:07 am

I watched another pilot launch unhooked using your (Jonathan's) technique.
As many agree, all systems can fail when you fail to use them.

I believe the absolute largest cause of failures to hook in can be attributed to the pilot's belief that it won't happen to him because he has a good system.

Greg Kendall's technique is centered around several "hook in" checks while on launch, and timed as closely to the launch run as possible.

Windsports supports this concept by promoting adherence to 3 principles…..

1. Due to the many possible distractions on launch, I'm a prime candidate for a hook-in failure.
2. A hook-in check expires every 15 seconds.
3. A hook-in check should be the last thing you do before the decision to run. If not, do it again.
Safety is a book, not a word
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greblo
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Post by greblo » Thu Sep 29, 2016 9:08 am

I watched another pilot launch unhooked using your (Jonathan's) technique.
As many agree, all systems can fail when you fail to use them.

I believe the absolute largest cause of failures to hook in can be attributed to the pilot's belief that it won't happen to him because he has a good system.

Greg Kendall's technique is centered around several "hook in" checks while on launch, and timed as closely to the launch run as possible.

Windsports supports this concept by promoting adherence to 3 principles…..

1. Due to the many possible distractions on launch, I'm a good candidate for a hook-in failure.
2. Your hook-in check expires every 15 seconds.
3. A hook-in check should be the last thing you do before the decision to run. If not, do it again.
Safety is a book, not a word
Michael Robertson

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barton
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Post by barton » Thu Sep 29, 2016 9:47 am

edited 6.20.2018
Last edited by barton on Wed Jun 20, 2018 11:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

Greg Kendall
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Post by Greg Kendall » Fri Sep 30, 2016 7:10 am

It’s been mentioned that my hook-in verification technique is to establish a line that cannot be crossed without checking everything. It’s also been mentioned that it’s doing repeated checks on launch. Actually, it’s both of those things, plus hooking in at the setup location. The idea is massive redundancy. If I was perfect, I might use just one check. I’m not perfect. I need a system that can tolerate some brain farts.

There are good arguments for doing a hook-in check immediately before launch. There are also good arguments for doing that off of launch where there are fewer distractions. I say do both. There’s more at http://www.shga.com/forum/phpBB2/viewto ... 8&start=20

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JD
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Post by JD » Fri Sep 30, 2016 7:55 am

greblo wrote:I watched another pilot launch unhooked using your (Jonathan's) technique....
I believe I perform the Lift and Tug in a manner that will not produce a false tug upon my groin area. But we should all be wary of false verification using any technique. Even hang checks have resulted in pilot separation and so has using the Aussie method of first attaching the harness. Muscle memory and habit can just as easily end a pilot as secure a pilot.

Pseudo-inspections are key to disaster and they happen because of human nature. Know your nature and know your own pitfalls.

Steve D
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Re: hook in faliure (almost)

Post by Steve D » Wed Oct 05, 2016 11:40 pm

jdevorak wrote:My normal procedure is to hook in my harness to the glider and then get into my harness. A new step was added to the procedure because my new radio PTT is hard wired and needs to be dealt with.
Have you considered adhering to the requirements of your proficiency rating, jdevorak?

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lswendt
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Post by lswendt » Thu Oct 06, 2016 12:22 pm

There's nothing like a visual. Turn around and look to see if you're hooked in. I do it on launch all the time.

Also, my good friend J Shelly used to tell me, "Never refuse a hang check." I understand pilots are in the moment when they are walking to launch but one more check doesn't hurt.

As someone who has been on pilots' nose wires when they did their hang check, I was frequently asked, "How does everything look?" by the pilot--who was looking down. My response was, "Think it looks fine but you may want to look for yourself."

Best not to rely on others' eyeballs.

There is no ONE solution--ALL are wonderful.

Steve D
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Post by Steve D » Fri Oct 07, 2016 11:51 pm

lswendt wrote:There is no ONE solution--ALL are wonderful.
I suspect that Kunio Yoshimura's fatherless kids would disagree with ALL are wonderful solutions.

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Chip
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Carabineer Position

Post by Chip » Tue Nov 08, 2016 10:34 am

While using Ron's Tenax 3 while I was in AZ, hook in checks before launching were of course taking care of themselves since you are lying down in the cart before launching.

However, the issue I had was the carabineer rotating on me and laying on the locking gate. This was primarily because there was nothing to keep the orientation of the carabineer from rotating.

My new Tenax 4 has an "O" ring to keep this from happening. So a hook in check is good, but it should also include a process that ensures your carabineer cannot be oriented incorrectly. :roll:

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